On The Edge of the Desert - China, Minqin Gansu.
       
     
  Statistics from the United Nations show that 27 percent of the country’s land mass is desert with an average of 2,460 square kilometres of land being lost to advancing deserts each year. 
       
     
  Outside an abandoned village to Chinese construction workers are clearing a country road before it gets a new coat of asfalt. The increasing desert storms cover the roads and hinders traffic on the road leading to Inner Mongolia.
       
     
  In Minqin local NGOs like Save Minqin work to stop the desertification. One of the methods is plating bushes that help stop the sand from be swirled with the wind.    The sand storms from here are notorious in Beijing where they cover the capital with sand in the spring. As far away as in Los Angeles the sand storms from Northern China have been traced.  
       
     
  Nearly 400 million people or almost one third of China’s population live in the affected areas. Desertification – land degradation in dry lands usually due to climate changes and human activity  – poses an environmental threat to Minqin as well as China.
       
     
  When China’s premier, Wen Jiabao, visited Minqin back in 2007 he said that the government would make it a national project to save Minqin. Local authorities have already launched several campaigns to try and help the area. Along the paved roads of Minqin signs that instruct to save water and protect the environment are everywhere. Along the same roads green houses designed to minimize water usage have been built with help from the local government. Most farmers have changed irrigation methods and others have changed their livelihood from farming to breeding of animal to use less water.
       
     
desertification07.jpg
       
     
  Local peasants are building a hen house in Minqin. Like many other peasants In Minqin, they no longer can cultivate their land due to the lack of water and drought and now the local authorities support new Businesses such as sheep and chicken farming.
       
     
  The Lu family lives in a cluster of houses many kilometres off the paved road which can only be reached by a narrow bumpy country road. Han Yu Hua, 30 (on motorcycle), her husband Lu Xiang Ning, 34, their son Lu Hui, 3, and daughter Lu Jing Jing, 8, have lived here all their lives with their house next to the desert. For generations, they has tried to keep the sand from their door by planting trees and bushes. But the situation has worsened. Before it used to take around fifteen minutes to reach the desert. Today the Tengger desert desert starts right after the family’s back yard.    As long as he and his wife can maintain their living standard he is satisfied with living on the edge of the desert in Minqin. But when it comes to his children, he has different hopes.  “I want them to leave the area and go as far away as possible. Then they can get a better future,” he says.  
       
     
  The biggest challenge in the life of the family Lu is water. The ground water used to be just a few metres down from the surface and you could dig down to it reach it, says Lu Xing Ning, 34 (resting in coach). Now only machines can reach the water. The water always has a slightly salty taste. The Lu family drinks it from small cups but they have to boil it well. If not, they can risk getting liver infections or worms, says Han. Over the years she has learned to make the insufficient water last. The family never showers. Water used to clean the vegetables is also used for washing hands. Water used to clean the dishes is later given to the sheep or pigs. The harsh climate has left its marks on the face of Lu. The deep lines around his eyes, his sunburnt skin and dried-out lips make him look older than his 34 years.    As long as he and his wife can maintain their living standard he is satisfied with living on the edge of the desert in Minqin. But when it comes to his children, he has different hopes.  “I want them to leave the area and go as far away as possible. Then they can get a better future,” he says.  
       
     
       
     
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GPS WARRIORS FIGHT DEFORESTATION IN DRCONGO,  MANGA
       
     
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The Black Sea is eating Georgia, Batumi
       
     
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On The Edge of the Desert - China, Minqin Gansu.
       
     
On The Edge of the Desert - China, Minqin Gansu.

For thousands of years Crescent Lake has been one of China’s famous tourist attractions and drawn people from near and far. Today tourists still flock to the lake, but soon they will loose the chance to see the lake with their own eyes.

Since the 1950’s the waterlevel in Crescent Lake has fallen about 10 metres and the lake is slowly turning to sand. The ground water being the biggest source of water in Dunhuang has decreased rapidly through the last years thanks to overpopulation in the area and unsustainable methods of watering the agricultural fields.

  Statistics from the United Nations show that 27 percent of the country’s land mass is desert with an average of 2,460 square kilometres of land being lost to advancing deserts each year. 
       
     

Statistics from the United Nations show that 27 percent of the country’s land mass is desert with an average of 2,460 square kilometres of land being lost to advancing deserts each year. 

  Outside an abandoned village to Chinese construction workers are clearing a country road before it gets a new coat of asfalt. The increasing desert storms cover the roads and hinders traffic on the road leading to Inner Mongolia.
       
     

Outside an abandoned village to Chinese construction workers are clearing a country road before it gets a new coat of asfalt. The increasing desert storms cover the roads and hinders traffic on the road leading to Inner Mongolia.

  In Minqin local NGOs like Save Minqin work to stop the desertification. One of the methods is plating bushes that help stop the sand from be swirled with the wind.    The sand storms from here are notorious in Beijing where they cover the capital with sand in the spring. As far away as in Los Angeles the sand storms from Northern China have been traced.  
       
     

In Minqin local NGOs like Save Minqin work to stop the desertification. One of the methods is plating bushes that help stop the sand from be swirled with the wind.

The sand storms from here are notorious in Beijing where they cover the capital with sand in the spring. As far away as in Los Angeles the sand storms from Northern China have been traced.  

  Nearly 400 million people or almost one third of China’s population live in the affected areas. Desertification – land degradation in dry lands usually due to climate changes and human activity  – poses an environmental threat to Minqin as well as China.
       
     

Nearly 400 million people or almost one third of China’s population live in the affected areas. Desertification – land degradation in dry lands usually due to climate changes and human activity  – poses an environmental threat to Minqin as well as China.

  When China’s premier, Wen Jiabao, visited Minqin back in 2007 he said that the government would make it a national project to save Minqin. Local authorities have already launched several campaigns to try and help the area. Along the paved roads of Minqin signs that instruct to save water and protect the environment are everywhere. Along the same roads green houses designed to minimize water usage have been built with help from the local government. Most farmers have changed irrigation methods and others have changed their livelihood from farming to breeding of animal to use less water.
       
     

When China’s premier, Wen Jiabao, visited Minqin back in 2007 he said that the government would make it a national project to save Minqin. Local authorities have already launched several campaigns to try and help the area. Along the paved roads of Minqin signs that instruct to save water and protect the environment are everywhere. Along the same roads green houses designed to minimize water usage have been built with help from the local government. Most farmers have changed irrigation methods and others have changed their livelihood from farming to breeding of animal to use less water.

desertification07.jpg
       
     
  Local peasants are building a hen house in Minqin. Like many other peasants In Minqin, they no longer can cultivate their land due to the lack of water and drought and now the local authorities support new Businesses such as sheep and chicken farming.
       
     

Local peasants are building a hen house in Minqin. Like many other peasants In Minqin, they no longer can cultivate their land due to the lack of water and drought and now the local authorities support new Businesses such as sheep and chicken farming.

  The Lu family lives in a cluster of houses many kilometres off the paved road which can only be reached by a narrow bumpy country road. Han Yu Hua, 30 (on motorcycle), her husband Lu Xiang Ning, 34, their son Lu Hui, 3, and daughter Lu Jing Jing, 8, have lived here all their lives with their house next to the desert. For generations, they has tried to keep the sand from their door by planting trees and bushes. But the situation has worsened. Before it used to take around fifteen minutes to reach the desert. Today the Tengger desert desert starts right after the family’s back yard.    As long as he and his wife can maintain their living standard he is satisfied with living on the edge of the desert in Minqin. But when it comes to his children, he has different hopes.  “I want them to leave the area and go as far away as possible. Then they can get a better future,” he says.  
       
     

The Lu family lives in a cluster of houses many kilometres off the paved road which can only be reached by a narrow bumpy country road. Han Yu Hua, 30 (on motorcycle), her husband Lu Xiang Ning, 34, their son Lu Hui, 3, and daughter Lu Jing Jing, 8, have lived here all their lives with their house next to the desert. For generations, they has tried to keep the sand from their door by planting trees and bushes. But the situation has worsened. Before it used to take around fifteen minutes to reach the desert. Today the Tengger desert desert starts right after the family’s back yard.

As long as he and his wife can maintain their living standard he is satisfied with living on the edge of the desert in Minqin. But when it comes to his children, he has different hopes.  “I want them to leave the area and go as far away as possible. Then they can get a better future,” he says.  

  The biggest challenge in the life of the family Lu is water. The ground water used to be just a few metres down from the surface and you could dig down to it reach it, says Lu Xing Ning, 34 (resting in coach). Now only machines can reach the water. The water always has a slightly salty taste. The Lu family drinks it from small cups but they have to boil it well. If not, they can risk getting liver infections or worms, says Han. Over the years she has learned to make the insufficient water last. The family never showers. Water used to clean the vegetables is also used for washing hands. Water used to clean the dishes is later given to the sheep or pigs. The harsh climate has left its marks on the face of Lu. The deep lines around his eyes, his sunburnt skin and dried-out lips make him look older than his 34 years.    As long as he and his wife can maintain their living standard he is satisfied with living on the edge of the desert in Minqin. But when it comes to his children, he has different hopes.  “I want them to leave the area and go as far away as possible. Then they can get a better future,” he says.  
       
     

The biggest challenge in the life of the family Lu is water. The ground water used to be just a few metres down from the surface and you could dig down to it reach it, says Lu Xing Ning, 34 (resting in coach). Now only machines can reach the water. The water always has a slightly salty taste. The Lu family drinks it from small cups but they have to boil it well. If not, they can risk getting liver infections or worms, says Han. Over the years she has learned to make the insufficient water last. The family never showers. Water used to clean the vegetables is also used for washing hands. Water used to clean the dishes is later given to the sheep or pigs. The harsh climate has left its marks on the face of Lu. The deep lines around his eyes, his sunburnt skin and dried-out lips make him look older than his 34 years.

As long as he and his wife can maintain their living standard he is satisfied with living on the edge of the desert in Minqin. But when it comes to his children, he has different hopes.  “I want them to leave the area and go as far away as possible. Then they can get a better future,” he says.  

       
     
Fights with the Desert off in the Backyard

VIDEO w/ Danish subtitles (DUR: 2:00) with the Lu Family: 

gps warriors 10pix04.JPG
       
     
GPS WARRIORS FIGHT DEFORESTATION IN DRCONGO,  MANGA
       
     
GPS WARRIORS FIGHT DEFORESTATION IN DRCONGO, MANGA
gps warriors 10pix10.JPG
       
     
gps warriors 10pix11.JPG
       
     
gps warriors 10pix07.JPG
       
     
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Villagers map the rainforrest from deforestation w/Danish subtitles (dur. 3:47)
       
     
The Black Sea is eating Georgia, Batumi
       
     
The Black Sea is eating Georgia, Batumi
02familienshverdag.jpg
       
     
10familienshverdag.jpg
       
     
13familienshverdag.jpg
       
     
12familienshverdag.jpg
       
     
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Ismail and the Ocean w/ Danish subtitles (dur. 2:47)